Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Transferring Analogue Recordings

A few years ago, I started converting some of my out-of-print record albums and burning the resulting MP3 onto a CD, my preferred medium. It is a project that I have put aside but one that I need to return to. I wasn’t using the right software program previously because it wouldn’t separate the individual tracks, which is something that makes the transfer easier. As a record collector, I have some jazz records from the 70’s and 80’s that have not yet been released on CD or as a digital download.

There are a number of arguments regarding the superiority of vinyl over digital. Some people claim that vinyl contains a warmer sound and that analogue contains a more accurate transfer rate. Some of the opposing arguments say that there is virtually no difference between vinyl and CD and that so many other things contribute to the overall sound quality, such as the turntable, the needle, the amplifier, or the speakers.

I began moving away from vinyl in the late 80’s. Storage, the listening experience, and convenience are what concerns me. Unless one has shelves made expressly to hold records, records are difficult to store and often warp when they are not properly cared for. The overall listening experience is determined by the quality of the medium, with scratches on a vinyl recording ruining the experience—for me, at least. I also find digital copies more convenient because I can either place the music on my phone and use an auxiliary cable in the car or sync my phone and the car stereo, using Bluetooth. Bluetooth is also an option when playing music on the sound bar that is connected to the television. Another option, and one that I prefer, is burning the files onto a CD and using the CD in the car, in the kitchen, in the clock radio/alarm clock, or on the stereo located in my home office.

The quality of the vinyl recording wasn’t as important to me when I was listening to music with few, if any, lows or quiet passages. That changed once I started listening to ECM recordings in the 1970’s. On one occasion, I remember getting the record home and discovering that the scratch created during the manufacturing process ruined my listening experience of Keith Jarrett’s Arbour Zena

At some point in the future, I hope to hear Hubert Laws’ The San Francisco Concert, Zbigniew Namyslowski’s Air Condition, Pepper Adams’ Reflectory, and the Art Pepper Quartet at the Maiden Voyage, which is available on two other albums besides Road GameArt Lives and Art Pepper Quartet. These are just some of the albums that have not yet been recently released as a CD or as a digital copy. 


Some of the other albums of mine have since been released on CD, but I am reluctant to spend the money when I can instead transfer the music. The cost of the software is ultimately cheaper than replacing the albums, even when considering the cost of a plastic CD cover and the recordable CD itself.